Glenluce and Galloway Flyers
Landing in a cross wind
Depending on the model and the strength of the wind, this is the tricky bit! More highly loaded models are easier as long as you keep a bit of extra speed on in your approach and don’t try to slow it up too much. If you come in at your normal landing speed, you run an increased risk of a tip stall with disastrous consequences. I’ve seen this happen way too often. You must also remember to keep enough airspeed on as you make your last turn in to line up with the runway otherwise again you run the risk of flicking out in a tip stall that will be all over before you can do anything about it. In a crosswind landing use little or no flap and be prepared for a longer and faster run out than normal. If you are trying to land a slow, lightly loaded model, allow it to yaw as much as you can to get a bit of bite into the wind. WW1 biplanes, vintage models and small foam electric models can be made to crab in very slowly, but don’t slow up too much otherwise they can just drop out of the air or flick over in an instant. As soon as they are on the ground, use rudder to turn them directly into wind and reduce throttle to idle. You need to keep “flying” such models even when they are on the ground to prevent them ground looping round or tipping over. Do this until a helper is able to approach from behind the model and secure it for you. I’ve seen many models burst undercarriages in crosswinds because there was too much side stress on them as soon as they touched down whilst still yawing sideways. You need to be ready on the rudder and ailerons to turn into the wind a bit to take the pressure off the U.C. when you touch down. Make sure you turn the model into wind to stop it lifting a wing tip and being blown over. A good way to learn these skills is to gradually practise in milder crosswind situations to learn what the model does and how it behaves differently. In time you will be able to increase your level of challenge as your experience and skills grow until the point where you are comfortable with even a full 90 degree gusty crosswind. I would always advocate getting to know your model’s flying characteristics very well before you attempt to take off, fly and land in crosswind conditions. Ally Young
Glenluce and Galloway Flyers
Landing in a cross wind
Depending on the model and the strength of the wind, this is the tricky bit! More highly loaded models are easier as long as you keep a bit of extra speed on in your approach and don’t try to slow it up too much. If you come in at your normal landing speed, you run an increased risk of a tip stall with disastrous consequences. I’ve seen this happen way too often. You must also remember to keep enough airspeed on as you make your last turn in to line up with the runway otherwise again you run the risk of flicking out in a tip stall that will be all over before you can do anything about it. In a crosswind landing use little or no flap and be prepared for a longer and faster run out than normal. If you are trying to land a slow, lightly loaded model, allow it to yaw as much as you can to get a bit of bite into the wind. WW1 biplanes, vintage models and small foam electric models can be made to crab in very slowly, but don’t slow up too much otherwise they can just drop out of the air or flick over in an instant. As soon as they are on the ground, use rudder to turn them directly into wind and reduce throttle to idle. You need to keep “flying” such models even when they are on the ground to prevent them ground looping round or tipping over. Do this until a helper is able to approach from behind the model and secure it for you. I’ve seen many models burst undercarriages in crosswinds because there was too much side stress on them as soon as they touched down whilst still yawing sideways. You need to be ready on the rudder and ailerons to turn into the wind a bit to take the pressure off the U.C. when you touch down. Make sure you turn the model into wind to stop it lifting a wing tip and being blown over. A good way to learn these skills is to gradually practise in milder crosswind situations to learn what the model does and how it behaves differently. In time you will be able to increase your level of challenge as your experience and skills grow until the point where you are comfortable with even a full 90 degree gusty crosswind. I would always advocate getting to know your model’s flying characteristics very well before you attempt to take off, fly and land in crosswind conditions. Ally Young
© 2020 Glenluce and Galloway Flyers
© 2020 Glenluce and Galloway Flyers